Lankapage Logo CP 19 YEARS
Go Home Home Serving the Sri Lankan community globally since 2000
go to LankaPage.com

Leading News from Sri Lanka::

* Sri Lanka bombings increase economic, external risks; IMF key
Fri, May 17, 2019, 07:36 pm SL Time, ColomboPage News Desk, Sri Lanka.

May 17, Colombo: The tragic Easter bombings in Sri Lanka will result in lower economic growth this year and could increase external financing pressures, Fitch Ratings says.

These pressures are mitigated by the government's continued adherence to economic policies and targets that have enabled Sri Lanka to get its IMF program back on track.

According to the global rating agency, last month's bombings, which targeted major hotels in Colombo as well as churches, will lead to a reduction in tourism receipts, which had risen steadily in recent years to USD4 billion in 2018, or about 5% of Fitch-estimated GDP.

Fitch Ratings thinks the 2019 GDP growth could be 1.0pp-1.5pp lower than its 3.6% forecast when the agency last reviewed Sri Lanka's sovereign rating in December due to reduced arrivals and spending.

Full statement by Fitch Ratings:

Fitch Ratings-Hong Kong/London-16 May 2019: The tragic Easter bombings in Sri Lanka will result in lower economic growth this year and could increase external financing pressures, Fitch Ratings says. These pressures are mitigated by the government's continued adherence to economic policies and targets that have enabled Sri Lanka to get its IMF programme back on track.

Last month's bombings, which targeted major hotels in Colombo as well as churches, will lead to a reduction in tourism receipts, which had risen steadily in recent years to USD4 billion in 2018, or about 5% of Fitch-estimated GDP. The Sri Lankan government had forecast a further rise to USD5 billion this year. In response to the bombings, it now plans to launch an extensive tourism promotion campaign, alongside efforts to support the sector that could reportedly include VAT cuts and subsidies.

The full impact on tourist arrivals will depend on the government's success in restoring security and the effectiveness of the measures to support the sector, particularly once the peak season begins in November. Nevertheless, we think 2019 GDP growth could be 1.0pp-1.5pp lower than our 3.6% forecast when we last reviewed Sri Lanka's sovereign rating in December due to reduced arrivals and spending. Backward linkages to the wider economy have been significant, through job creation and construction activity, and could amplify the impact.

There will also be a significant impact on the current account deficit. Tourism provided nearly half of last year's services receipts (USD8.4 billion) and the Sri Lankan authorities estimate that the current account deficit could widen to 2.7%-2.8% of GDP in 2019, compared with their earlier forecast of 2.3%.

March's USD2.4 billion sovereign bond issue helped ease near-term fiscal and external financing constraints, but vulnerabilities would increase if the bombings undermine market confidence for a sustained period. Foreign-currency-denominated sovereign debt repayments for 2019-2022 total USD16.8 billion against the government's projections of reserves of between USD7.2 billion-USD7.5 billion at end-2019, down from its earlier projection of USD8.0 billion-USD8.2 billion.

These challenges increase the importance of Sri Lanka's IMF programme in catalysing funding support and as a policy anchor. The IMF Executive Board completed the fifth review under the programme this week, noting that it had been successfully brought back on track after being put on hold during Sri Lanka's political crisis last year. Completion of the fifth review releases USD164 million, bringing total disbursements under the programme to USD1.2 billion. Importantly, the IMF also extended the programme by a year, to June 2020, giving more time to complete economic reforms.

The adequacy of FX reserves and refinancing risks remain key for Sri Lanka's sovereign rating, as highlighted in our rating sensitivities. Our downgrade to 'B'/Stable from 'B+'/Stable last December reflect heightened external refinancing risks, an uncertain policy outlook, and the risk of a slowdown in fiscal consolidation due to the political crisis. Political tensions could resurface towards the end of 2019, when presidential elections are due.

 

ColomboPage - Recent 10 Stories ::
Term of Chief of Defense Staff extended
-- [3 minutes ago]
CA Sri Lanka to break gender barriers in boardrooms with 'Board Ready Female Members Directory'
-- [44 minutes ago]
Foundation laid for Marine Aquatic Research Center
-- [1 hour and 13 minutes ago]
World Food Programme extends support to vulnerable areas in Sri Lanka
-- [2 hours ago]
PM urges party leaders to finalize draft constitution of Democratic National Front
UNDP reiterates support to Sri Lanka to achieve SDGs
President commissions P625 ship gifted to Sri Lanka Navy by China as SLNS Parakramabahu
CID submits report on six high profile cases to AG
CAA to conduct island wide survey on drones
President's office clarifies President did not comment on Kashmir during meeting with Pakistani HC

Copyright © 2000, 2016 by LankaPage.com (LLC) :
The news and other contents on ColomboPage are copyrighted property of LankaPage.com, LLC. Any unauthorized use of any information on ColomboPage may constitute a violation of copyright laws. You need written permission to reproduce, republish, post, transmit, broadcast or distribute, material from this site from LankaPage.com, LLC. However, news organizations or broadcasters in Sri Lanka may republish the news items in ColomboPage with proper acknowledgment to ColomboPage.